The Congress has passed legislation that will end the partial shutdown of the federal government and allow for more borrowing to avoid a default.

That’s progress, Washington style. It’s tantamount to bailing a floundering lifeboat with a teaspoon.

Still, it had to be done.  The country–make that the world–was seriously questioning whether the United States was about to sink.

Yes, Americans can return to national monuments and hyper-sensitive Wall Street can calm down… for now, thanks to an act of legislative triage.

But really significant problems remain.

Washington’s political dysfunction is reaching new lows.  The legislative and executive branches could not reach agreement on even the most basic responsibility—funding the government—until it approached a crisis.

Ideologues rail against compromise, but no government can function without give and take.  In negotiations, an astute minority doesn’t overplay its hand, and a wise majority never squeezes the minority into humiliating submission because it knows that roles will one day be reversed.

But now deals in the nation’s capital are harder to come by than parking spaces. Trust is a scarce commodity.

While the politics swirl, and conflict drives the news cycles, the country continues a steady march toward fiscal peril.

The debt has reached $17 trillion and continues to climb.  According to the Congressional Budget Office, entitlement and other mandatory spending will rise by $1.6 trillion, or 79 percent, over the next ten years.

The bi-partisan National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform (Simpson-Bowles) concluded in its 2010 report “Our nation is on an unsustainable fiscal path. Spending is rising and revenues are falling short, requiring the government to borrow huge sums each year to make up the difference.”

The commission recommendations include a balanced approach of spending cuts, tax, health care and Social Security reforms to bring spending back in line with revenues.  It’s a reasoned framework for a legitimate negotiation to repair the country’s fiscal house.

The Congress is supposed to have that debate now; it’s part of the legislation to avoid default and send government workers back to their jobs.  But we’ve heard that tune before, and it’s difficult to be optimistic given the magnitude of the challenge and the history of inaction.

A continuing resolution to fund the government and raise the borrowing limit for a few months is to fixing the debt what putting gas in your car is to rebuilding the engine.

Somehow Washington has to regain its footing, rededicate itself to the altruism of public service and ensure that we’re not repeating the same fight a few months from now.

 

 

 

bubble graphic

110

bubble graphic

Comments

  • Bob Melphis

    “The modern conservative is engaged in one of man’s oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.”
    ~John Kenneth Galbraith

  • Chuck Anziulewicz

    I have no doubt that when the debt ceiling issue raises its ugly head yet again, in just a few months, the GOP (and particularly the Tea Party faction) will be bent on REVENGE.

  • john

    Solution starts with the voters of America. We can not vote the same people in term after term and expect things to change.

    • wvman75

      I'm just glad that Manchin's gun grabbing, suddenly Obamacare loving butt is going to be on the ballot in 2016.

  • wvman75

    I think there's going to be plenty of Obamacare effect by 2016. I also think the conservatives had good intentions, both in trying to force attention on addressing spending and the national debt, and in trying to spare America the expense and harm of Obamacare.

    I also think they were right and will be proven so

    It's how they got in Congress to begin with. That's what the people elected them to do.

    Unlike our Senator, who ran against Obamacare and suddenly goes along once he gets to Washington. At least they had the courage of their convictions and knew what their constituents elected them to do.

  • Joelle

    More of the blame tea party crowd. No blame for the Dems who want to keep their subsidies? No blame for the Dems who don't want obamacare but want to force it on Americans who don't want it? Of course. Dems refuse to negotiate. Dems refuse to do their constitutional duty to pass a budget. Just accumulate more debt, more entitlements, and keep people sucking from the government teet. Yep screw the tea party. Lets become like Detroit, the real result of democrat utopia.

    • Hillboy

      How exactly is Detroit the result of democrat utopia?

      • TDisaHemorrhoid

        Democrat mayors and city councils for decades. Anywhere you have long term democrat rule, you have over taxation, over regulation, rampant crime and drugs, and with that, you have dying cities. Look at Chicago. Newark, NJ. Philly. Southern WV. Add to that California, and now you have dying states.

        • Hillboy

          Are you saying that the collapse of GM had nothing to do with the decline of Detroit? Or the massive loss of manufacturing jobs had nothing to do with the decline of the other cities you mention? That it was all due to local politics? I'd say that both parties stood by idly while the US hemorrhaged manufacturing jobs for three decades.

      • realitycheck

        Hillboy - are you serious? Really?

    • TD

      Hopefully we are witnessing the end of the TEA party. The Republican party has long had a coalition of business interest plus Joe six pack. They did a marvelous job convincing Joe six pack his interest were the same as the Mitt Romney's of the country. They were able to achieve this using God, guns, gays and abortion. Not that the business community gives a hoot about those things but that's how you get middle America to show up at the polls and it worked wonderfully well.

      Now however we have the TEA Party aligned with business and the TEA Party doesn't seem to care much what business wants. Business didn't want this instability and messing with default but the TEA Party did it anyway. How does this coalition stay together??

      How does the TEA party survive without big business money stoking it? The Republican Party is in for some interesting times.

      • bulldog95

        So getting the right to show up and vote is as simple as talking about god, guns, gays, and abortion? Thats it? Will you be praised for this comment or be told to knock it off and quit sterotyping people?

        Thats like me saying handouts, foodstamps, and cellphones get the left out to vote.

        Also, please scroll up and take a look at my question to your first post here today. I know you saw it but are to afraid to answer it because it will show you to be the hypocrite you are.

    • James

      I agree Joelle.

  • CaptainQ

    Hoppy, your commentary today is 'spot on!'

    All this last second bill is a Band-Aid for the nation, not the cure for what ails the Federal Budget. The only thing it does is reopen the government and 'kicks the cans' of the Federal Budget and the Debt Ceiling down the street until early next year.

    Is ObamaCare a bad piece of legislation? Of course it is! Does the rising debt of the Federal government need to be stopped? Yes again, but the way the Tea Party wing of the GOP tried to address these issues was 100% WRONG! It was as dangerous as a doctor trying to convince a hospitalized patient that he needs a special new surgery by shutting off his life support.

    No matter what happens with the budget talks in the future, the Republicans have created a Public Relations nightmare for themselves. In the eyes of the American people, it is the GOP who was responsible for manufacturing this whole shutdown mess in the first place. Didn't they realize that by taking this course of action, they played right into the Democrats' hands? This crisis makes the 'job' of the Main Stream Media much easier in 2014. It won't take much to keep making the GOP look bad after they virtually shot themselves in the foot with the government shutdown. This bit of political strategy has backfired badly for the Republicans. We could see the first signs of this come next November in the mid-term elections. All the GOP gained from this disaster is the anger of the American public. Although neither political party comes out smelling like a rose in this, the Republicans stink a whole lot worse!

    • Joelle

      I think you are misreading the American public. According to Rasmussen, 13% say we are headed in the wrong direction. 78% want to have an entirely new Congress. The TEA party was actually just doing what they were elected to do. The establishment is the problem. The Dems know that if they refuse to negotiate, Boehner and company will eventually fold. You think this was done the wrong way? Fine. What would you suggest? What was wrong with a clean CR that was offered just with a caveat that all go on obamacare. No exemptions. The law has been illegally changed, and no one stands up and says stop, except a few representatives. That is what people are angry about. The Dems knew that Boehner would wilt, they had no reason to compromise. At least Ted Cruz had the guts to try .

      • CaptainQ

        I beg to differ, Joelle. I find it hard to believe the MAJORITY of the American public supported the government shutdown that was caused by the GOP. Sure, the followers of the Tea Party faction were giddy with delight, but they only represent a small percentage of the citizens of America. Those who were inconvenienced from the shutdown certainly don't share this view. How about all those federal workers who were either furloughed or (as was the case in many Federal offices) FORCED to come to work every day WITHOUT pay? You think all of them cheered the government shutdown?

        I believe that history will judge both the GOP and the Tea Party movement harshly as time goes by. It was the wrong course of action. Do I have a better suggestion for spurring Congress to action on ObamaCare and the rising national debt? I confess, I do not. But even Stevie Wonder could see the folly of trying to hold Obama and the Federal government 'hostage' in an attempt to hinder ObamaCare. Who was the mental midget who came up with this 'brilliant plan' in the first place? Ted Cruz? The press is already calling him the 'new Sarah Palin' of the GOP!

        And you say Cruz has 'guts' in doing this? Ok, let's go with that! If you vision Ted Cruz as General George (blood and guts) Patton from the movie of the same name, then I picture the American people as the two soldiers from one scene from that film. The scene where General Patton rode by on his jeep and one soldier said, "There he goes, old blood and guts," and the other said, "yeah, our blood, his guts."

        You nailed it perfectly, Joelle!

        • bulldog95

          I am sorry Q but this entire debate about being not getting paid holds no water. They will get back way, and honestly with direct deposit the money will probably be in the bank by Friday.

          Lastly this partial shutdown lasted 16 days. 16 days, 16, thats it. Most places of business pay their staff at the middle of the month and the end of the month. Take a guess where the middle of the month pay period is, YUP, yesterday. So its not like those people would have been getting paychecks until yesterday, so they will get maybe tomorrow or maybe even today at close of business.

        • Joelle

          I see. The house sends a bill to defund. Senate shelves it. House sends bill to delay. Senate shelves it. House sends bill to fund all but ocare. Senate shelves it. House sends bill to make congress enroll in ocare. Senate shelves it. House again sends bills to fund parts of government as is usually done in a budget. Senate doesn't even vote and the shut down occurs. And the republicans, who voted to fund the government and avoid shutdown, are to blame. Makes perfect sense.

        • Cory

          Pretty good post, Cap. I do you think you may been a little insensitive to the blind, however.

        • john

          Democrats and the progressive republicans ae worried about Cruz, you can tell by the way they are trying to destroy him in the media. He speaks for people that haven't had their voices heard, it scares the establishment.

        • Cory

          Good post, Cap. However, I think you may have been a little insenstive to our blind friends.

    • TD

      +1

      • TD

        My +1 was meant for Capt. Q's comment, not Jollee. She must be looking at the same polls President Romney did when he didn't bother writing the concession speech. Ooops, did I say President Romney? my bad!

        • Joelle

          BTW I agree GOP will lose ground next election. But not for reasons cited. They will lose because they are rinos

      • Joelle

        Actually, I was looking at current Rasmussen poll, who I believe also had Romney losing. -1

        • James

          Forget the Polls. They can make the Polls look anyway they want them to look.

    • James

      I believe as a whole the American people are as disgusted with the Republicans and the Democrats not to mention the absolute Hate of Obama. But Obama doesn't have to run again ! Thank God....

  • TD

    Excellent column today Hoppy, you are exactly right although I wish you had said this earlier, like two weeks ago.

    It doesn't take a genius to figure this out, combination of spending cuts and tax increases are needed. Obama's offer a couple years ago was a $3 trillion in spending cuts for $1 trillion in new taxes. Boehner liked the deal at the time but the radicals in the house, not the silent majority of Republicans who cow down to them, ruled the day. Hopefully moderates in the house will find their voice and work with Boehner and the Dems to make some real progress. Surely this debacle will expose the TEA Party members and weaken their position. If not the Republican party, and with it the country, are in even bigger trouble as zero progress will be achieved.

    • The bookman

      The grand bargain fell out of favor on both sides of the aisle in that the right could not move past $800 million in new revenue but the left could not stomach the cuts to entitlement programs...and let's be honest, the only place you can find that kind of money is in those programs... That coupled with the backdating of those spending cuts to the end of the ten year budget term resulted in a deterioration of trust in the deal...not accurate to lay this on the tea party...it's the establishment of both parties that rejected the grand bargain

      • TD

        you're probably right about most of that. The cuts were delayed because Obama thought the economy was to fragile at the time to stand a big hit. Obama is willing to go this route again, question is can he get cooperation from Congress, both sides.

        Where I see the real problem is the absolute ideology of the right. In the Fox News presidential debate Republican candidates were asked if they would take a $10 cut for $1 in new taxes and NONE raised their hand. That has to change.

        • The bookman

          Primary candidates always run to the right or left to appeal to the base then move to the center in the general...I think after having their hats handed to them by the dems, the repubs can get back to the revenue number from lady deal ...the tough one will be the cuts ..after winning the day , I would be shocked if Reid doesn't overplay his hand.. In his view he won, why compromise and cut entitlements in an election year!

          • The bookman

            Last years deal, not lady deal in above post

        • bulldog95

          Just like how a certain senator said that raising the det ceiling is a failure of leadership and votes no to raise the debt. Now that he is president he wants it raised and it was just politics back then.

          So in TD's world Obama is playing politics but republicans are heartless uncompromising people that need to change.

    • bulldog95

      So heres a question for you TD or any other leftist that I doubt will be answered.

      If the republicans gave you a 10 year budget with 10 cut for a 1 tax increase with the cuts taking place on year 1 and the taxes on year 5? Would you take it? Would you say this is a good deal?

      • bulldog95

        And yet again the almighty, all knowing, only person that knows whats really going on has avoided my question. Typical.

  • Roy Riggleman

    Where is John Raese when you need him? I have no plans to vote for either Capito or McKinley in 2014, both need primaried after this vote.

  • Wowbagger

    Hoppy,

    This might be considered a fine point but real money is made in the stock markets on market volatility with a fairly predictable ending, not ever increasing prices. Shrewd traders are making money on these big swings either up or down where the outcomes are predictable. The last few days have been a trader's dream.

    Ah, well! I hope all of you federal employees had a good retroactively paid vacation. The check is in the mail or whatever.

    • Hop'sHip

      Bagger: Are you one of those shrewd traders?

      • Wowbagger

        Too busy with my day job this time, but I do understand the principles and frankly haven't been secretive about my understanding in the past on this mb.

        You seem like a bright guy and perhaps should consider geting involved yourself if you haven't already.

        • Hop'sHip

          I'm a little too risk adverse for that wow. But I don't begrudge those people who take advantage of it if we are stupid enough to increase their opportunity to do so.

          • Wowbagger

            This time the politicos provided the opportunity, but more often it is other circumstances. There are times that options trading on some stupid corporate move can make you a buck or two. Massey Energy, for example provided a wealth of opportunities in their time. All you have to do is win a few more than you loose.

  • Medman

    Average folks no longer believe anything coming out of DC and are ignoring the foolish fights that always predict the end of the Earth if this bill or that tax is not approved. This bill solves nothing and only delays the fight for a few weeks, at which time we will have another round of headlines and hand-wringing warnings that will in large part be ignored by 75% of us. That is the real problem we face as a country.

  • David Stanton

    The sensible long term solution is to pass a balanced budget constitutional amendment.

    • The bookman

      Realistically we can't do it yet...too far gone to achieve that without taking the 17 trillion dollar debt of the current budget conversation...too much of our annual expenditures are exhausted just in the debt service...maybe in twenty years of real focus on reducing our spending and paying down our debt could we even consider it...we spend over a trillion dollars more annually than we take in...about 1/3 of expenditures are borrowed...imagine cutting 1/3 out of your family budget...that is austerity and that won't fly...incrementally we might be able to get there..some think it is no longer possible...that is why you see the heated debate...the far right says shut it down, no more, draw the line in the sand...the middle says this is broke and we need to fix it. And the far left says we can't stop now,, we can spend our way to a better economy...the far right is too extreme and impossible to implement...the middle can't gain any traction..and the left is in control...

      • Hop'sHip

        Bookman: I don't agree with much of your analysis and the assumptions underlying it, but at least it is a reasoned analysis. When you say that the problem is out-of-control entitlement spending, I have to interject that you are describing a symptom not a cause. What is causing havok with our budgets, not only the federal budget, but government budgets at all levels, private business budgets and personal household budgets, is out of control health care costs combined with changing demographics. The Affordable Care Act was an effort to address this problem. I take it that, like many here, you believe it inadequate or actually makes the problem worse. Could you tell us how we should be addressing this problem?

        • The bookman

          My view is your view, to a degree ...I agree that the problem is out of control health care costs...but due to the growing prevalence of government funded health care through Medicare and Medicaid...enrollment in these two programs have increased dramatically over the last 15 years and as federal and state governments represent a larger and larger share of what would be considered the total health care payer pool, costs have skyrocketed! Why is that the case??

          1. Compliance... It costs health care providers more to deal directly with the government than with insurance or private pay customers...

          2. Reduction in reimbursement...the federal government only pays a portion of the fees billed to them...as part of the overall reimbursement schedule for health care services...as a result the cost of services increases because health care providers will not take a loss on the services rendered.

          As the percentage of Medicare and Medicaid patients relative to the overall patient pool increases you can see why costs continue to be on the increase...constant upward pressure on price...and with ACA waiting in the wings...look out...

          The same holds true for any industry...remember back in the 80's the story of the $400 hammer and the cost of defense contracts...government is big, slow dumb, and expensive...remember

          • bulldog95

            I would have to say that the 2nd one is the biggest player. The doctor does something that warrants 2,000 and then medicare cuts the doc a 500 check and we are suppose to think that is ok? Thats how that 2,000 quickly turns into 8000, so that the doc actually gets the 2000.

          • The bookman

            Bulldog: the percentage is not accurate, more in the 60% range by the providers I've engaged, but your premise is right...when the doc or hospital only had a small percentage of those types of situations they could count it as a marginal loss and absorb it...as government reimbursement continued to represent a greater portion of their business it can no longer be sustainable.. Therefore the price of services increases both to recover additional fee for service from the Feds and from insurers or private pay patients...some providers will negotiate down the fee for service with private pay patients but not all...

            As to the solution,, much more complicated...less government reimbursement as a portion of the total pie, which requires more private sector payout, which requires a return to a thriving economy, which requires the myriad holes in this sinking ship to be plugged...sorry,,I alone cannot offer that solution...that will take all of us and then some!

          • Hop'sHip

            1. Compliance... It costs health care providers more to deal directly with the government than with insurance or private pay customers...

            Where is your evidence for this. Every study I have looked at found the Medicare Advantage program to be more costly than the traditional Medicare program. You do realize that any hospital of significant size deals with hundreds of different plans, all with their own rules as to how to secure payment and thus employs a phalanx of people just to work their way through the maze. Do you not think this adds to cost? The cost shifting you describe is real but I don't understand its significance to overall costs. Are you arguing that the answer is to limit access to the health care system? Could you give an example of another developed country where this has worked?

          • The bookman

            HH: I find it interesting that you would compare two government programs, albeit one infused with private sector insurance companies, to compare cost...of course Medicare advantage would have an increased cost associated with it because it has added layers of compliance but also is mandated to follow all the rules and schedules of Medicare...and nowhere in any of my posts do I suggest we limit access to health care...however I think the president's plan will ultimately lead to just that as a function of what we could afford...as I believe his plan fully implemented leads to single payer universal health care...why do you believe health care costs have increased, and what solutions do you offer?

          • Hop'sHip

            I have long argued here that the incentive structure we have set up for health care is wrong. I would like to see us move toward a structure that rewards providers for geting and KEEPING people healthy rather than rewarding them for the number of tests and procedures they do. I also have argued that ACA has provisions that move us in that direction. I thought you were making the common argument for "privatizing" government programs to save money but you admit that would only add costs. So I guess you are arguing for eliminating all government involvement in providing health care and let health care be like most other services, available only to those with the private means to assume the costs. Is that your argument?

          • bulldog95

            Wait a minute there hopship, you do know why doctors order all those tests that "reward" them dont you?

            So lets not play games here, I will answer it for you. Patient X has a disease that only if the doc had ordered test Z, it would have been found and they would still be living. Patient X's remaining living family sues the doctor.

            I am not so naive as to think that some doctors order tests to milk the system but to borrow a line from my good buddy mtnman, I think that they are in the minority and really do care and want what is best for their patients. They are also covering their butt because of the sue happy society.

          • The bookman

            Not at all... Try to stay on point...our discussion involves high cost of health care in this country and it's role in the state of our financial affairs ..we agree on that...my opinion, based on my own experience and personal discussions with health care providers at all levels , from the small town dr. To the hospital er doc to the small hospital administration to large public and private hospitals, is that continuing on this path of increasing the governments presence in that industry will only lead to higher and higher costs ..the way we achieve a greater private sector participation and less government involvement is to improve the private sector economy..ACA does not take us in that direction...just the opposite...few have the means to handle out of pocket medical expenses...the safety net however can't hold us all..like the debt limit there is some level that becomes unsustainable...and I believe on both instances we have crossed that line.

          • Hop'sHip

            You're right, you have lost me. I think you are saying that repealing ACA and reducing the number of people on government health programs would improve the business climate and lead more businesses to offer better healthcare benefits, even though in a global economy they are competing against firms in other countries that don't have any direct health care costs. Am I getting closer? How do you measure the current "business climate"? Seems like profits have been doing just well, judging by the stock market.

          • The bookman

            The current business climate is horrible.. Business fears the true impact of ACA, and the fed has inflated the stock market with their easy money!

          • Hop'sHip

            Again, how do you measure the business climate? Heresay? So the stock market just reflects a Fed-induced bubble? The same true for corporate profits?

            http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/CP

          • The bookman

            Look HH:::

            I think I've had enough today ..we can pick this up another time..not that I'm out of answers, just tired of beating the dead horse...you can take solace that your team won, and as a result we all get to see at least a partial implementation of what you believe to be a big part of the solution....as a true American I hope you're right and I eat crow...but as an engaged citizen of this country, one who pays very close attention to what is going around me and my family, I fear the worst is yet to come. See ya later!

          • Hop'sHip

            I understand. I feel weary too from beating that same horse from the other side. Not sure its dead yet, though.

  • Bald Headed Pig Cop

    We need to spend more on security. White al-qeada is evrywhere these days.

  • zero tolerance

    I wonder if this little tidbit had any influence on the decision making?

    http://m.wfpl.org/?utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fm.facebook.com%2Fl.php%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwfpl.org%252Fpost%252Fmcconnell-reid-deal-includes-3-billion-earmark-kentucky-project%26h%3DdAQG8bjEF%26s%3D1#mobile/7237

    • GregG

      If this had been Sen. Byrd this would be a big headline.

  • Jeff Lewis

    People need to realize that the only reason we were able to get in this created crisis is because we haven't had an approved budget for over two years!
    That was the one thing in this agreement that I was thrilled to see. Even though the constitution requires a budget be passed each year, this congress has ignored that.
    John Boehner has refused to even create a budget committee for the last two years, so it would be impossible to negotiate one. In this agreement they passed a separate law that requires them to meet to pass a budget by December 15th.
    No household could pay their bills without a budget but yet the congress has intentionally failed to to even try to create one over the past couple of years and this is why the debt ceiling has to keep being raised.
    I have to give praise to Senator Manchin and the bipartisan senators that came together to work out a deal to get us out of this mess. There were 7 Republicans 6 Democrats and 1 independent that put there own political preferences aside and did what was best for the country.
    These are the type of Representatives that we should have in Washington. The ones that no matter democrat or republican doesn't matter. What matters to them is what is best for the country as a whole. The "middle of the road' politicians are what we need and that's why they work well together. The far left liberals and the far right tea party extremists have to go.
    In the upcoming elections, we need to vote for these people that are willing to compromise, not those that hold the American economy hostage and then say it's what the American people want,
    that's a bunch of bs!
    So for those in Washington that are so far off center, they can't even see the middle if the road, we have to vote them out. Democrat or Republican doesn't matter. Tell them if your that far out of touch with what the American people truly want.....you're fired!
    We will gladly replace you with more like the 14 Senators that came together to show how the American political system is truly supposed to work!

    • Joelle

      Funny. The Republican House has passed budget after budget after budget, and the Democrat Senate has refused to bring it to the floor for a vote. No budget in over two years? Try five years. Even with a majority on both houses democrats have refused their constitutional duty to pass a budget. But, yeah, it's the tea party's fault. Got it.

      • The bookman

        Nice to see someone else is paying attention...the problem is really how the leadership in the house allows itself to get worked over by the democrat machine...the dems are just much better politicians in staying on message and marshaling their votes...the media doesn't help in as much as they are in the tank with the dems as well... But we can't allow that as an excuse, cause that ain't changing...so the republicans have to get their act together and make some progress with the upcoming budget talks...think incremental steps...these problems we face are ours, dems and repubs have all played a role in racking up this debt...can't let this deteriorate into it's all obama's fault or all Bush's fault...it doesn't really matter...can't we agree that we can't continue on this path and formulate a budget strategy that takes us on a path that pays down our debt instead of adding to it without back loading all the debt reduction to the last 20% of the budget term...

    • Medman

      Jeff, Can you explain why Harry Reid has not allowed the Senate Budget Committee to even have mark-up hearings on the past five Obama budgets?

    • DonaldH

      Try at least 5 years!!

    • bulldog95

      Lost cause here folks, move along.

    • TDisaHemorrhoid

      Dude,
      The president of the US is required by law to file a budget with the US Senate every year. Since year 1 of the Obama administration, Obama has not filed a budget. Not once. Put the Progressive Kool-aid and bong down.

      • bulldog95

        I thought the president has submitted budgets and when the senate votes on them it turns out to be 0-99 not in favor of his budget.

  • Bob

    Until political official are strapped with a mandate from the voters to not spend $0.46 for interest of every tax dollar on reducing the debt we will doom our children and grandchildren. Term limitation of congressmen would help.