CLARKSBURG, W.Va. — Members of a group which advocates on behalf of children and families are presenting their priorities to House of Delegates Speaker Tim Miley. Northern Organizer for “Our Children, Our Families.”

The legislative agenda they’re seeking strikes close to home.

“Forty-eight percent of families in West Virginia struggle to make ends meet,” she said during an appearance on MetroNews Talkline. “These are working families that are doing everything they are told to do correctly, but are still finding it hard to make ends meet.”

Wotring would know, she’s one who benefited from many of the state’s social services for children and families during a difficult period of her life.

“Twenty-one years ago at the age of 18 I became a single mom. I was struggling and had to make a choice to stay in a cycle of violence or throw myself into a cycle of poverty,” she shared. “I made the choice to break the cycle of violence.”

She said she was very lucky and was able to take advantage of a number of programs for which she’s now advocating which helped her get back on her feet.

“The great thing about our campaign is this is what democracy looks like,” she said. “We say we are not representing kids and families, we are actually community members, kids, and families that are struggling to do this and coming with solutions and bringing those to the table which we know are working.”

Their legislative priorities come in no particular order:

–Expanding home visiting and early childhood programs statewide

–Talking about minimum wage

– Protecting family support networks

– Promoting 30 minutes of physical activities in schools

– Substance abuse programs (making pseudoephederine a prescription medication and access to pay for it through Medicare)

– The future fund

The group hopes they’ll get the attention of lawmakers and be able to share their first hand experiences. They want to explained the difficult conditions¬†in today’s world and the solutions those programs made in their lives.

 

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Comments

  • Trudi

    Looking at this article, and I listened to the interview on the radio, and I still can't figure out which of these legislative priorities equates to "throwing money at the problem". Guess it's just me.

  • WVIRGINIAN FOR LIFE

    Just another continuation of society wanting the state or fed govt to subsidize lives that were short changed because parents made poor decisions. News flash....you don't have children you can't take care of and don't expect taxpayers or charitable societies to fill that gap when you screw up.

  • Jim McKay

    The article seems to be missing a paragraph identifying Lisa Wotring as the Organizer with Our Children, Our Future Campaign, who appeared on Talkline today.

    The snippet when sharing via Facebook also says "butt" instead of "but".

    Thanks for the coverage though.

  • Steven

    Actually the 48 percent are there because their parents were not there for them. They did not have the parents that made sure they had clothes wear or make it to school. They had the kind that didn't even make sure there was food in the home to eat.

    It is amazing how many people think they grew up "poor" in West Virginia, because they didn't have the right tennis shoes or their parents didn't help them pay for college. That isn't poor for many here. Poor is no parent to wake you up for school and no one that even cares if you go.

    People do the best they can to cope with the hand that has been dealt. Judging them is easy, understanding is what is hard.

    I get it that Joe, John, and Bulldog take the easy route. They must have had parents that made it easy for them.

    • Joe

      Quite the contrary, Steve. You do not know my background either, and a little advice, leave my parents out of it.

      The problem is a definition of compassion. They want money to pay for the situation, not prevent it.

      If she wants to know why this situation exists, she simply needs to look in the mirror. How about money for abstinence programs? How about a ban for taxpayer funded pregnancies, etc.

      You all want is to feel sorry for these adults....I do not. I eel sorry for the kids who are already doomed to a next generation of welfare.

      • Trudi

        You overlook that these adults were those "doomed" children a generation ago. I know there will always be stingy, miserly people in the world who don't want to help. It's just a harsh fact of life.

        • Stephen

          The vast majority of the 48 percent are working people... they just work in jobs that don't make enough to make ends meet...

          • Joe

            What does the term "working people" mean exactly? Thanks.

        • Joe

          Help with what?!

  • bulldog95

    Lets throw more money on a war that can not be won and has been going on for decades.

    The war on poverty and drugs can not be won by tossing money at it, if it was that simple it would have been over decades ago.

    Heres a free lesson. Dont get knocked up as a single parent at the age of 18.

  • john

    AMEN, Joe

  • Joe

    The majority of this 48 percent are in the position they are in due to conscious decisions they made:

    Not finishing high school.

    Becoming pregnant at 18 and younger, thus having children they cannot afford or bring into a responsible family setting.

    Having minimum wage jobs, remaining single and having more kids.

    Not doing anything to improve the situation except to buy lottery tickets and tattoos.

    Not being involved on their kids education thus ensuring this dependency cycle is passed on to their children.

    • Steven

      Actually the 48 percent are there because their parents were not there for them. They did not have the parents that made sure they had clothes wear or make it to school. They had the kind that didn't even make sure there was food in the home to eat.

      It is amazing how many people think they grew up "poor" in West Virginia, because they didn't have the right tennis shoes or their parents didn't help them pay for college. That isn't poor for many here. Poor is no parent to wake you up for school and no one that even cares if you go.

      People do the best they can to cope with the hand that has been dealt. Judging them is easy, understanding is what is hard.

      I get it that Joe, John, and Bulldog take the easy route. They must have had parents that made easy for them.

    • Gilbert Gnarley

      There's that dadgum "not being there for them". Sounds like double-speak for "I'm trying to hold someone other than myself accountable". That's a hard excuse to swallow when these clowns are in their 40s or 50s and are still looking to blame society for their plight rather than themselves.

      It's up to each of us to make our way. Society gives and gives and gives and those "poor, downtrodden" continually want and want and want.

      If you want to succeed it still can be done. Society doesn't need to subsidize the American Nightmare at the expense of those of us who have worked for the American Dream.

      Politicians need the stones to admit that at some point the teat runs dry and the excuses run out.

      I'm waiting now for the phrase "don't judge me".

      I'm stepping down off my soapbox now.