CHARLESTON, W.Va. — ‘Take Me Home, Country Roads’ could be heard echoing through the state Culture Center late Thursday morning.

This was because the students of the West Virginia Ambassadors Camp were serenading Gov. Jim Justice, First Lady Cathy Justice and a crowd of a couple hundred people during a West Virginia Day celebration, celebrating the 156th anniversary of West Virginia’s founding.

“We’ve had all kinds of festivities and activities today,” Charles Morris, state Director of Museums said on Thursday.

“We’ve got special educational programs down at the education room. We’ve had performances in the great hall, cake cutting, so there is just something for everybody here.”

Gov. Jim Justice posed for pictures with all the ambassadors and visitors, before snacking on a gold and blue cupcake. A special West Virginia Day cake was cut by Cathy Justice and a selected ambassador, to go along with the cupcakes.

Office of the Governor

Jim Justice

“This has to be the greatest state in the union. It’s so blessed,” Jim Justice said. “The beauty is unbelievable, the people are unbelievable, we are located right in the sweet spot with unbelievable natural resources. It’s absolutely the greatest state in the land.”

35 special edition West Virginia Day Blenko glass pieces were on sale for $69 each and Morris said the pieces sold out quickly.

Miss West Virginia Madeline Collins was on hand to sign autographs, take pictures and meet anyone in sight.

Madeline Collins

Following the cake cutting ceremony and singing by the Ambassadors was an interfaith service celebrating and praying for the state.

“We try to celebrate as much of it as we can on June 20,” Morris said. “We also celebrate it throughout the year. We do the history in the state museum and the building we have constant activities. June 20 being the birthdate of West Virginia, it makes it so special.”

The state museum located at the Culture Center on the Capitol complex is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on Sundays and Mondays.

“The state museum is an immersed environment,” Morris said.

“You go through the complete history of the state including the frontier period, civil war period, so there is a little bit of everything. Our glass, our pottery, woodworking, all those things are celebrated in the state museum.”