Money, in and of itself, does not win elections. But then again, it’s awfully hard to win without it.  With that in mind, here are the latest campaign finance numbers for key candidates in the critical federal races in West Virginia for 2014.

Republican 2nd District Congresswoman and U.S. Senate candidate Shelley Moore Capito tops all fundraisers for any race. She pulled in $830,000 in the fourth quarter and has a substantial war chest of $3.7 million.

Capito’s likely opponent, Democratic Secretary of State Natalie Tennant, got a later start in the campaign. The 4th quarter was her first full fundraising period since entering the campaign last September and she collected an impressive $647,000 in October, November and December. She has $604,000 on hand now.

Fundraising increased substantially in the 4th quarter by the two leading candidates in the 3rd District Congressional race.  Incumbent Democrat Nick Rahall brought in $428,000, almost as much as he had raised in the previous nine months of the year.  Rahall now has $840,000 in the bank.

Republican challenger, state Senator Evan Jenkins, worked the phones in the last quarter and secured contributions totaling $202,000.  He now has $367,000 in his campaign treasury.

In the 2nd District, Democratic favorite Nick Casey continues to build a substantial campaign fund.  The Charleston attorney raised $95,000 in the final reporting period of 2013 and now has $548,000 in the bank.

The Republican field in the 2nd District continues to grow.  There are now seven candidates in the race:

Alex Mooney, who was active in Maryland politics before moving to West Virginia a few years ago, has the most money of any GOP candidate in the race: $301,000.  Charlotte Lane has $255,000 in the bank after raising $215,000 in the 4th quarter.  Berkeley Springs pharmacist Ken Reed has $226,000 in his treasury, nearly all coming from a personal loan to his campaign.  Ron Walters, Jr., has $63,000 on hand.

State Auditor Glen Gainer decided in early November to enter the 1st District Congressional race, so his first report includes less than two months of fundraising.  The Democrat collected $70,000 and has most of that in his campaign fund.

However, Gainer has a way to go to catch his opponent, at least when it comes to raising money. Republican incumbent Congressman David McKinley collected $178,000 in the final quarter and reports $1.3 million in the bank.

Most candidates hate to raise money—imagine working the phone for hours, asking people to part with their cash—but every viable candidate must do it, and do it well.

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  • mntnman

    Money does not equal speech. It equals money. Of course, SCOTUS disagrees.

    • GregG

      I couldn't agree more. I have yet to understand that concept. But then again, there isn't much in the Constitution that I don't feel is massaged to fit whatever the needs of the one reading it desires. Kind of like the bible, if you don't "read it" and take from it what someone else does, then your "taking it out of context". Funny how that works.

  • mntnman

    Money in politics will destroy America. Period. Yeah, its been here all along, we know that. Look where its gotten us. Government is now beholden to the interests that give them the most money. Special interests buy the airwaves, run misleading/outright lying ads, and the public buys it. (If you say something enough, it must be true.) The ultra-rich have carved out a special place for themselves in politics -- SuperPACs -- and now they get to do and say what they want, without disclosing who they are. The press has become advocates for "their" viewpoint, instead of referees, seeking the truth. Money really rules the day. It is disgusting to watch, disheartening to see and depressing to know. But, it is what it is.

    So...we the people have to be smarter. We have to study more. We have to think about who we're electing. We have to rely on ourselves to get information. We have to be independent in our decision-making when we vote. We the people can fix this -- by ignoring the ads, the advocacy media and deciding what is best for all. If we dont', well...

    • Wirerowe

      Mntnman you have very well stated the issue and the solution. But collectively we must not give up on trying to get money out of politics.

    • Hop'sHip

      "We the people can fix this -- by ignoring the ads, the advocacy media and deciding what is best for all. "

      How do we go about deciding what is best for all? The bookman believes he is well informed and espouses a shock therapy for the federal budget that from my reading of economic history would set us spiraling into a global economic depression. I think we would both claim that our position is "what is best for" most, if not all.

      • Defend and PromoteThe Constitution

        What advocacy media? the NYTIMES? CBS 60 Min.? or Just Rush Limbaugh and Ann Coulter?

      • GregG

        Currently I am not required to work Sunday or holidays such as Christmas. In the past, yes I have held jobs that required working both. Do I "forgo" the Sabbath? Yes, I "forgo" the Sabbath. But I have learnt over the years that should you want to have lunch at a local restaurant on Sunday, you better get there before church lets out and all those folks "forgo" their religion.

        • Charleston

          So you forgo the Sabbath by not going to church, but still participate in it by resting during that day of the week? If you truly believe that there should be a separation of church and state, then why do you participate during those respective days? Based on your part of logic on "how to turn this country around', you would hold true to your word and not participate during those days and work, but I'll digress. Peace to you.

          • Charleston

            Based on you statements that our societal problems would be cured by simply taking money out of politics and keep religion in church. I found that hypocritical from someone who takes advantage the Sabbath Day and who works. To boot you stated that the evil Big Businesses do that as well! Hilarious! Thanks for the laugh! Sorry for the regression. Now I'll digress.

          • GregG

            Resting? If I want to mow the yard, I mow the yard. If I want to cut wood, work in the garden or tinker on a project, I do. If I want to "trade" on Sunday, I trade. Don't really know what your fishing for Charleston, but you might want to look around at all the Big Businesses that operate and "trade" on the Sabbath.

      • The bookman

        I decide what is best for me, not all. I engage in careful study of the issues and attempt to impress on others why I believe the conclusions I have reached are best for the city, county, state, or country. Your view is different than mine. That's ok with me.

        I never said you were uninformed. I specifically said otherwise. I, like mntnman, believe it is the responsibility of the people to choose the right path. My point is that the average voter is lazy and uninformed. That is not a description of you, but the average voter. But I would say this argument exemplifies the difference between us, in that you obviously have no faith in the people to do their due diligence and make educated choices, and therefore right the ship. I believe that not only can we do it, we must, as it is our responsibility.

        • GregG

          Bookman you state....."I believe that not only can we do it, we must, as it is our responsibility", but are you willing to take money and religion out of government? Do you actually believe that taking money and religion out of government can actually be accomplished? Or do you even feel the first step in correcting our problem is eliminating the power and influence that money and religion has on our government? Would the likes of Capito or Manchin even seek a political position if they were limited to a $50,000 campaign fund of which no money could come from business? If organized religion was no longer given tax exempt status, would your Bush types seek office without their army of bible toting soldiers? Todays politicians do not strive to better our cities, counties, states or nation. They strive to better their bank accounts. You want to see who has true patriotism and wants to turn this country around, cut off the money and keep religion in the church.

          • The bookman

            Defender:

            +1

          • Defend and PromoteThe Constitution

            To simply say "special interest" is a "speech" issue truly trivializes a special interest groups right to exist and function.
            Their Right is a right to peacefully assemble and petition their government.

            I'd don't like George Soros and I don't like Karl Rove and what they do-- but what I do like and enjoy is their Right to do it.

          • Defend and PromoteThe Constitution

            Really, keep religion in the church? then keep "sexuality" in the closet-- lobbyist groups come in all colors of the rainbow, ya know. And the money from labor as well teacher unions can stay in the closet too..

            Funny how when conservatives started matching liberals dollar for dollar; hyperbole for hyperbole it somehow come about from the likes of that Biden, Schumer and the POTUS that "special interest groups" are ruining our country.

          • GregG

            Charleston, I answered your question, but for some reason it's "awaiting moderation".

          • Charleston

            GregG: If you back your statements regarding "separation of Church (of England) and state" do you go to work on holidays such as Christmas and also do you forgo the Sabbath? I am curious to your answer?

          • GregG

            Thanks for taking the time to comment Bookman. Seems, in a way, we are on the same page.

          • The bookman

            I would welcome limiting the money that flows into campaigns from special interest. I don't know how you achieve it though as it is a speech issue. The only way would be for our political leaders to vote their conscience, not for special interest. When the money spent stops equating to influence in government, the money will stop. But free speech should be protected as it is no coincidence that it is the First Freedom.

            And I think religion has cost true conservatives more than they have gained from it. I would like to see the Republicans marginalize those planks on their platform, even if it costs them votes... I think more middle of the aisle people would migrate to the party. Don't get me wrong, I personally line up with most of those planks ideologically, but like you, find them to be better handled in a cultural sense than in our political theater. You can't legislate morality, and that's a quote that been around awhile.

    • GregG

      That's what I have been saying for years mntnman. We DO NOT have a government "of the people". Big business and the ultra rich control our government. Sadly, I do not share the same optimism as you mntnman. I don't believe it can be fixed.

    • The bookman

      +10

  • The Nose Knows

    With Obama's War on the Right by using the IRS to suppress voter turnout, will it have any effect on the 2014 election? Lets review, there were 4,000,000 less republicans that turned out to vote in 2012 as opposed to 2010.
    What is the biggest voter turnout impediment, the voter ID law or the IRS?
    Hands down, the IRS. The election fraud perpetuated by the democrats in 2012 on the American people will be remembered in 2014 and especially 2016.
    There will be no Hillary in 2016.

  • CaptainQ

    Hoppy, with few exceptions in recent times (Jim Humphreys and a GOP candidate with the initials "J.R.") having lots of money usually wins major elections in this state. That's why it's important to pay attention to fund raising numbers, they can serve as a key indicator. Give or take the 'Obama Factor' effect on major Democratic Party candidates in WV, money will play a vital role both the primary and general elections here this year. Money could make the race for the U.S. 2nd District the most compelling of the others since there seems to be one major Democrat (Nick Casey) running against a myriad of GOP contenders who will likely have to spend much of their campaign 'war chests' on the primary alone. Could Shelley Moore Capito's commanding campaign fund lead seal the win for her U.S. Senatorial bid? And what of the monetary advantages of U.S. House incumbents Nick Jo Rahall and David McKinley?

    Yes indeed, this will be an interesting political year in the Mountain State.

  • TD

    Winston Churchill once said the greatest argument against democracy is to spend 5 minutes with the average voter. That would have to be updated in today's world, the greatest argument against democracy is that it is for sale and the rich and powerful can now buy the gov't they want. Wrapped up in the insanity that money is speech we see the wealthy getting their way on almost every issue of importance. We need publicly financed campaigns, then our representatives could work on what's best for the country without concerning themselves how their big donors will like their decisions. It would save trillions in the long run.

    • Defend and PromoteThe Constitution

      Well, Winston Churchill nor a democracy are relevant to the United States and our Constitutional Republic.
      However, because so many have been coerced into hating The Constitution we are now swarmed under with politicians running amuck.

      Thanks TD, HipHop and probably, maybe GregG

    • Perry

      Will Rogers once said " our elected officials are no better or worse than the people who elected them." Just sayin'.......

      • Hop'sHip

        Will Rogers was a wise man. My favorite of his:
        "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went."

        • Charleston

          Hopefully this will clear things up for you Hop's: Ecclesiastes 3: 19-21.
          Peace to you.

    • The bookman

      No, TD! Churchill had it right, and that truth and wisdom still applies today. The average voter is not misinformed, as much as they are uninformed. On what other premise can you explain Obama's quick ascension to the highest office in the land? Other than an inspiring Hope and Change message and the Big Networks being in the tank for him, what accomplishments in governing did he bring? Money creates that image. Whoever puts forward the best image or is more successful at tearing down the image of the opposition is the victor. Take private money out by public financing won't change a thing. Until people take individual responsibility for their vote, it will continue to be more of the same. If we as a voting public are generally asleep at the wheel, we have no one to blame but ourselves if we end up in the ditch.

      • TD

        Bookman, I'm not talking as much about the president as congress. It is congress that writes the laws, while most have certain local issues they are up on and concerned about for their constituents, they turn to the national party for direction on all the others. So for example, if a bill comes up about controlling or at least informing consumers about genetically altered foods, the first thing a congressman does is check with the national party and see how the Monsanto corporation wants them to vote. If a bill rises regulating Wall Street same thing, both parties get so much money from the banking industry no legislation gets passed to control it, thus the financial meltdown of '08.

        In the presidential debates Joe Biden said, "look, if you truly want to change everything you have to get money out of politics". In my opinion he was absolutely right.

        • The bookman

          I think we all would rather have more substance and less bling, but I don't know how that can be enforced as the cat has left the bag, and then burnt the bag. Any ideas?

          • TD

            This should tell you how much money controls our government. After reaching a budget agreement recently that was immediately criticized by the big money Republican donors John Boehner said, "Who's criticizing this agreement, the ones who haven't even read it? They made us shut down the government, that wasn't my idea. People knew I didn't want to do that".

            Yet he was the one who did it and why? BECAUSE, big money controls our government, to the point of shutting down the government because a few billionaires wanted him to do it.

            How can anyone think that is way our democracy was designed to work???

      • Hop'sHip

        the bookman: I voted for Obama. Are you saying that I and the millions of others were all ill-informed? Was that an informed vote that put his predecessor in office, the one who engaged us in two costly wars and drove the economy to the brink?

        • The bookman

          Your vote for Obama reflects your vision for this country. You remain consistent in your belief that he is leading us in the right direction. I believe exactly the opposite. Both of us I believe to be well informed, but differ in philosophy.

          What Churchill describes is the average voter, and they are uninformed. Do you doubt that statement? Have you spoken with average voters? Most vote for President as if it is voting for Homecoming Queen. It is a superficial process based on image and catchy message. Bush won because of the ineptness of Gore and Kerry. I was no fan of Bush, but he was certainly better than the alternatives.

          We need conservative leaders. IMH but informed O. I believe you would say misinformed, but at least informed in some fashion.

          • The bookman

            HH:

            Well currently you are getting in fiscal policy what you have voted for, so let's hope I'm wrong. But I'm sure when/if this current policy fails, it will still be Bush's fault.

          • Hop'sHip

            No bookman: I'm supposed to be UNinformed. You are MISinformed. Anyone calling for austerity economic policy under these fragile economic conditions is dangerously misinformed. Hopefully we the uninformed will prevail. Thanks for providing the Andrew Mellon perspective.

          • Jason412

            We need middle of the road leaders, not conservatives. Not that it will ever happen that way, but one can hope.

          • The bookman

            HH: Your misinformation is greatly appreciated and is accepted as a biased slant consistent with your world view. Thanks!

          • Hop'sHip

            We need conservative leaders? Really? To better protect the interests of the rich and powerful? I think their interests are already being represented quite effectively, especially with the Supreme Court decisions made by judges appointed by "conservative" Presidents.

      • wirerowe

        I agree that the responsibility of the voters is the last and best hope for democracy. But the unrestricted contributions of third party groups outside of either campaign are not good for the election process. I am not in favor of public financing. Our current laws are fine if we require everybody to give directly to either campaign with limits in place and prohibit third party advertisements that ostensibly are not tied to either party's campaign.

        • The bookman

          I think the Citizens United decision resulted from gray area in the law, and as a result they were forced to limit speech or overturn the ban. I choose free speech. Money in politics is the biggest problem we face, but there is no way to restrict it without providing fair enforcement across the board. If Fahrenheit 9/11 was not a hit piece targeted at unseating Bush, and the FEC could rule in that fashion, yet ban Citizens United from engaging in the same type of speech, it is obvious that the law as written at that time was being manipulated for political gain. If everyone can't play fair, and we believe in free speech, what other choice did the SCOTUS have?

    • Wirerowe

      Agree TD the Citzens United decision by the Supreme Court was a terrible decision for the American political process.

  • ShinnstonGuy

    Hoppy,

    With your knowledge of the Republican Party in West Virginia, do you expect a moderately conservative candidate representing the party in most of these races? In very conservative states, you often see radical right-wing candidates winning because of low voter turnout. In other words, only the fringe cares enough to come out and vote, translating into a lot of candidates that campaign on social issues or ridiculous theories about how the Government can be cut in half. I don't get the sense that will happen in WV with its much smaller population of registered Republican voters, but it would be good to hear what you think.

    • Defend and PromoteThe Constitution

      Shinnston,

      Please define through an example of what a "radical right winger" would believe.

      Would Thomas Jefferson Be a "radical right winger"? Would John F Kennedy be a "moderate Republican" today? Please give us a scale.

  • Jason412

    It amazes me people give these glorified telemarketers so much money.

    "Most candidates hate to raise money - imagine working the phone for hours, asking people to part with their cash"

    Oh yeah, I'm sure they just hate raising money. Imagine working the phones for hours asking people to part with their cash? You mean like the thousands of telemarketers who do the exact same thing for $7.25 an hour. What a hard life these politicians lead.

    • Welfare worker

      You have obviously never held a telemarketing job. It is an ansolutely loathesome job

      • Jason412

        I certainly have held a telemarketing job, first over the table job I ever had as a matter of fact.

        It sucks, there's no doubt about that. But it's far from hard work to read a script and written rebuttals.

        Regardless, my point was Hoppy makes it out like "imagine how terrible this is!" all I was saying is a lot of people do the same exact thing every single day for a hell of a lot less money.

        I bet there's not a telemarketer in the world that would call it a "loathsome job" if they were pocketing 3 million of the proceeds like Capito.

  • The bookman

    Doesn't seem to be the same groundswell against Rahall as just a few months ago. Think Jenkins has a more difficult hill to climb than previously thought. Still think Capito white washes Tennant easily, as well as McKinley over Gainer. Lots if time for momentum shifts and campaigning, but when was the last time you could see all Republicans win seats in Congress available in an election cycle in WV? Good sign that people are starting to pay attention to issues over D's and R's.

    • Wirerowe

      I agree bookman and add Nick Casey wins Capito's old seat and that is the way I see it coming down.

      • The bookman

        Casey has the name recognition, and I, like you, think that gives him the leg up. The Republican field in that district has zero recognition. But if we can elect Morrisey over McGraw, anything could happen.

        • Wirerowe

          We agree on many things but not on this one. If we could ever elect McGraw we could elect anyone.